Category Archives: European awards

Conservation Study of the Village Gostuša in Pirot district

08/02/2021

*Europa Nostra Grand Prix 2016

The researchers carried out an architectural survey on each building and produced detailed and comprehensive documentation regarding the architecture and construction techniques used in each individual structure. The study had a compelling educational element with a strong engagement from students in the relevant fields. The project coordinators were committed to clarifying the importance of the restoration works to the local community and were intent on involving and educating the village’s inhabitants in each aspect of the project. The completion of the study and building renovations has resulted in an enthusiasm for heritage among local people and an improvement in their rural lifestyle.

The project is of international significance and is already acting as an influential example of good practice thanks to the researchers’ contribution to international conferences and their perseverance in gaining recognition for the village of Gostusa and its surrounding landscape.

The jury found “the methodology and the approach to raising awareness of this village to be extraordinarily well done”. While the protection of the vernacular architecture is apparent, the study went beyond these material factors in boosting the cultural identity of the area and providing new potential for social and economic growth in this special region. The project should be regarded as an admirable example of the influence of good research and conservation.


Uglješa Šajtinac: Quite Modest Gifts

08/02/2021

*European Union Literature Award 2014

Uglješa Šajtinac’s book „Quite Modest Gifts“ received the European award for literature in 2014. Publishing house Arhipelag stated about the book: “An exceptional contemporary epistolary novel in which two brothers exchange emails in which they witness their American and Serbian, New York and Banat everyday life. A novel about Banat and New York. A family novel where destiny’s temptations of its members speak of the most challenging social questions of our time in an exciting and striking manner. Šajtinac wrote a moving and provocative chronicle of our days, a book in whose emails the last decade of our lives is given voice with an authentic strength. Intense and passionate, incorruptible and engaged.”

One of the most prominent contemporary writers from Serbia, Uglješa Šajtinac, received this significant European award in November 2014, together with 12 other European authors: Ben BLUSHI (Albania), Milen RUSKOV (Bulgaria), Jan NĚMEC (The Czech Republic ), Makis TSITAS (Greece), Oddný EIR (Island), Janis JONEVS (Latvia), Armin ÖHRI (Lichtenstein), Pierre J. MEJLAK (Malta), Ognjen SPAHIĆ (Montenegro), Marente DE MOOR (the Netherlands), Birgül OĞUZ (Turkey) and Evie WYLD (the United Kingdom).


Darko Tuševljaković: Jaz

08/02/2021

*European Union Literature Award 2017

Among 12 European countries, Darko Tuševljaković won the European Union Prize for Literature for 2017. European Union Prize for Literature, awarded every year to writers from 12 different countries, was also awarded, based on the decision made by national jury panels, to Rudi Erebara from Albania, Ina Vultchanova from Bulgaria, Bianca Bellová from the Czech Republic, Kallia Papadaki from Greece, Halldóra K. Thoroddsen from Iceland, Osvalds Zebris from Latvia, Walid Nabhan from Malta, Jamal Ouariachi from the Netherlands, Sine Ergun from Turkey and Sunjeev Sahota from the United Kingdom.

As it was said in the statement, through the awarding of this Prize, exquisite new literary talents are being recognised throughout Europe, and also the wealth of contemporary European literature is emphasised and attention is directed towards the unique cultural and linguistic heritage of the entire continent.

Serbian writer Darko Tuševljaković was awarded for his novel “Jaz” about the 90s, published by the publishing house Arhipelag, who said that it was great honour to receive such an important prize and be among the chosen authors from other European countries, and also among the previous winners of the award from Serbia (Jelena Lengold and Uglješa Šajtinac).

Tuševljaković’s “Jaz” is a novel about Serbia during the 90s and the beginning of a new century, but also about a young generation stretched between leaving and staying in their own country, but also about the older ones, overwhelmed by nostalgia and the struggle against time which was surpassing them. Displaying the life of young people in turbulent times and combining the elements of a social novel and phantasmagoria, Tuševljaković in “Jaz” shapes the stage where, in the middle of political and historical breakdowns, impressionable characters with their human and intimate dramas are being displayed.

“Jaz” is, as described by Arhipelag, an exciting story about how to survive history and preserve the right to one’s own specificity. The novel takes the reader to an extraordinary adventure from Belgrade to Kragujevac during the 90s, to the image of a family vacation in Greece, while in the parallel and intersecting stories personal and family dramas are being resolved, but also other historical forces and struggles with the self and the others.

Laureates receive a prize amounting to 5,000 Euros, but also numerous other benefits stemming from international visibility and cross-border promotion of their works, starting with the ceremony of prize awarding in Brussels all the way to presentations on the largest book fairs.


The Bač fortress reconstruction

08/02/2021

*The European Union Award for Cultural Heritage

The Bač Fortress began construction in the 14th-century with additions made in the 15th- and 16th-centuries and is a listed national monument. The project Centuries of Bač was initiated in 2006 to research and increase knowledge about the area of Bač; to implement key conservation principles in its preservation; to find a sustainable use for the site; and to raise awareness of its value among the wider community.

The conservation and rehabilitation of the Bač Fortress has been a central part of this project. The project was carried out by the Provincial Institute for the Protection of Cultural Monuments – Petrovaradin, and supported by its partners: the Fund for Preserving Cultural and Historical Heritage Centuries of Bač, the University of Novi Sad Faculty of Technology and the Museum of Vojvodina. The project received financial support from regional, national and international sources including EU funding. The project has successfully integrated the Bač Fortress into the life of the local community and has found a sustainable use to ensure its future. It has been restored, its archaeological remains preserved and its interior transformed into a vis- itor centre and exhibition space which helps visitors to interpret the wider cultural landscape of Bač. It has also become a centre where professional knowledge about heritage conservation and management is gained, enhanced and shared. For the past 15 years the Fortress has also been the regional central point for the European Heritage Days, an initiative of the Council of Europe. Due to the success of this project the Bač Fortress was listed on UNESCO’s Tentative List in 2010, as a part of the Historical place of Bač and its surroundings.

This project is an exceptional example of heritage preservation based on interdisciplinary collaboration. To achieve this, the project leaders have made use of European resources to research and carry out necessary preliminary investigations, which in turn has led to the implementation of a correct management strategy. A sustained effort has been made to maintain the aspect of the ruin through careful conservation. In addition there is a strong educational component relevant to the entire region, the jury said.

The town of Bač shows influences of Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, Byzantine, Islamic and Baroque styles, along with examples of vernacular architecture. The built heritage pays testimony to the cultural diversity of the area, linking the Balkans with Central and Western Europe. Some of its most iconic structures are now listed as national monuments: namely the Bač Fortress, the Bodjani Orthodox Monastery and the Franciscan Monastery of Bač. The Fortress is located in close proximity to the Danube, a river which has provided a link between many European countries, the jury noted.


European awards

Research and cataloguing of the State Art Collection

08/02/2021

 

*The European Union Award for Cultural Heritage

Despite its fascinating contents, the State Art Collection of Serbia was never fully researched or catalogued until 2006. In that year, a project to research the collection was initiated and funded by the Ministry of Culture of Serbia. Led by Professor Jelena Todorović with Biljana Crvenković, the project was carried out under the supervision of the National Museum in Belgrade.

The State Art Collection has a rich and curious history. It was symbolically founded in 1929 with the proclamation of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. The last additions were made in the late 1970s. The collection was intended to reflect Yugoslav and European ideals with some of Europe’s and Yugoslavia’s most notable artists featuring prominently, such as Nicolas Poussin, Gaspard Dughet, Palma il Vecchio, Ivan Mestrovic and Vlaho Bukovac and reflects the desire to merge local and European cultural values with the new national identity of Yugoslavia. The research team had to begin with very basic tasks. The collection was first correctly inventoried, full archival research undertaken on all of the present works and, finally, a proper database made (both digital and analogue) with a separate dossier for each work of art completed. The Jury commended what it deemed “the excellent quality of research on a remarkable collection of art”.

After this long and laborious task the fine arts catalogue was produced. Contributions to the artwork and provenance research were also made from a number of European mu- seums, among which were the Louvre (France), the Kunsthistorisches Museum (Austria), the Dubrovnik Museums and the Modern Gallery (Croatia), the Bergamo Museum and the Trieste Museums (Italy), the RKD Institute (The Netherlands), and the Museum of Modern Art (Slovenia).

The Jury much appreciated the printed catalogue, stating that the bilingual publication is of high quality and makes a significant contribution to the history of art and the history of art collecting. The appreciation of this forgotten, invisible part of European heritage has finally made these works available for the wider public to enjoy, most notably with the number of loans having been requested since its publication from other European museums. The Jury praised this aspect of the project, stating that the original intention of this collection was to embody the European spirit. This research study is an important rediscovery and reinstatement of this intention to be part of the wider dimension of European culture and art, bringing it to the attention of the wider public.

In addition, the collaboration with European partners has widened the researchers’ and museum’s network and created new opportunities for dialogue. The state-owned collection, previously accessible only to state officials and visiting dignitaries, has been made better known to a European public with some parts of the collection being publicly exhibited for the first time ever.


European awards , Uncategorized

The Pavilion of Prince Miloš at the Bukovička Spa

08/02/2021

*The European Union Award for Cultural Heritage

Despite its fascinating contents, the State Art Collection of Serbia was never fully researched or catalogued until 2006. In that year, a project to research the collection was initiated and funded by the Ministry of Culture of Serbia. Led by Professor Jelena Todorović with Biljana Crvenković, the project was carried out under the supervision of the National Museum in Belgrade.

The State Art Collection has a rich and curious history. It was symbolically founded in 1929 with the proclamation of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. The last additions were made in the late 1970s. The collection was intended to reflect Yugoslav and European ideals with some of Europe’s and Yugoslavia’s most notable artists featuring prominently, such as Nicolas Poussin, Gaspard Dughet, Palma il Vecchio, Ivan Mestrovic and Vlaho Bukovac and reflects the desire to merge local and European cultural values with the new national identity of Yugoslavia. The research team had to begin with very basic tasks. The collection was first correctly inventoried, full archival research undertaken on all of the present works and, finally, a proper database made (both digital and analogue) with a separate dossier for each work of art completed. The Jury commended what it deemed “the excellent quality of research on a remarkable collection of art”.

After this long and laborious task the fine arts catalogue was produced. Contributions to the artwork and provenance research were also made from a number of European mu- seums, among which were the Louvre (France), the Kunsthistorisches Museum (Austria), the Dubrovnik Museums and the Modern Gallery (Croatia), the Bergamo Museum and the Trieste Museums (Italy), the RKD Institute (The Netherlands), and the Museum of Modern Art (Slovenia).

The Jury much appreciated the printed catalogue, stating that the bilingual publication is of high quality and makes a significant contribution to the history of art and the history of art collecting. The appreciation of this forgotten, invisible part of European heritage has finally made these works available for the wider public to enjoy, most notably with the number of loans having been requested since its publication from other European museums. The Jury praised this aspect of the project, stating that the original intention of this collection was to embody the European spirit. This research study is an important rediscovery and reinstatement of this intention to be part of the wider dimension of European culture and art, bringing it to the attention of the wider public.

In addition, the collaboration with European partners has widened the researchers’ and museum’s network and created new opportunities for dialogue. The state-owned collection, previously accessible only to state officials and visiting dignitaries, has been made better known to a European public with some parts of the collection being publicly exhibited for the first time ever.


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